Fashion as a Form of Protesting and about Getting Politicized – Weekly Fashion News Roundup

Fashion as a form of protesting – What you take on it?

Fashion has always been a unique medium of expression. Every little fashion from any designer in the world, has ensured that the designer’s unique style or, thought is expressed through it.

Fashion has also almost always been a medium of expressing solidarity and creating awareness. From standing up in support of environmental concerns to animal welfare we have seen fashion participating in a variety of activities related to social awareness.

The latest in this is through boycotting.

Fashion as a form of Protesting

Fashion has the power to reach the masses and hence considering it as a form of protesting is a good way to reach the masses.

But is it right for Fashion to take a political approach by boycotting?

We have a roundup of news that stood out this week due to fashion’s participation in boycotting to show protest.

Model slams brands using fur in fashion after walking off photoshoot

This was a very bold move from a model. While I am in support of the move, I don’t really think there are a lot of people who are supporting the move.

The question is do we really need FUR to add style to our closet?

I personally do not think so. You can tell us your thoughts by commenting below.

mashable.com

It’s not everyday we found ourselves in a workplace situation that doubles as a full blown ethical conflict.

But for high fashion model and Australian export, Ruby Jean Wilson, it’s actually pretty common. The vegan and defender of animal rights was compelled to make a powerful statement on Facebook, slamming the fur industry, after she walked off the set of a photo shoot because it featured fur.

Wilson, who’s walked for labels like Louis Vuitton, Burberry Prorsum and Marc Jacobs, explained that was so confronted by the scenario she didn’t know what to do at first. Be professional and go through with the work? Or a leave for the sake of her morals?

Image Courtesy mashable.com

Read more at mashable.com

Fashion can be a powerful form of protest. The safety pin isn’t that.

There has been mixed reactions to Donald Trump’s election as President. While a lot of people are of the opinion that his views and ideas will trigger a lot of intolerance by way of discrimination, there are a lot of people who are supporting his ideologies because they think it will bring back the old USA.

While sentiments are running high, we will have to wait and see how things pan out.

There were reports that hate crime has increased since Trump got elected. And now people have found a unique way of expressing solidarity with the people being discriminated against. They have started wearing a safety pin as a mark of support.

This is a nice way of using fashion as a form of protesting.

fusion.net

Since Donald Trump was elected president two weeks ago, the number of hate crimes has risen to levels not seen in America since 9/11. There have been reported incidents of high schoolers chanting “white power” and swastikas with the phrase “Make America White Again” spraypainted on a building in New York. In response, Americans have started to wear safety pins on their clothing as a gesture of allyship with people of color, immigrants, and members of the LGBTQ community.

Originally a post-Brexit sign of support for immigrants, American fashion media outlets have jumped on the trend. Yahoo! Style called it a “powerful fashion statement.” Fashionista offered up “13 Safety Pins To Wear Now And For The Next Four Years,” featuring a $244 brooch that doesn’t even go to a cause. And on Friday, Vogue published “10 Ways to Wear Safety Pins Post-Election and Show Your Support,” featuring a $1,000 diamond-encrusted safety pin and $300 Gucci sneakers, because if you’re going show solidarity it should also unattainably expensive.

Image Courtesy : fusion.net

Read more at fusion.net

Is the fashion world becoming more political?

Fashion seems to be taking a slightly political approach these days. With a lot of fashion designers refusing to dress up people in the Trump family and some even boycotting a specific brand because it was being promoted by somebody in the Trump family, it is becoming quite evident that fashion is going the political way.

fashion as a form of protesting

From designers saying they will or will not be willing to dress Melania Trump, to boycotts of Ivanka Trump’s products, to an ideological embrace or rejection of New Balance sneakers, the worlds of politics and fashion seem more and more often to be on a collision course.

Fashion isn’t just a way to express oneself artistically anymore – somehow, unexpectedly, it’s become a central part of the political sphere following the 2016 election.

Image Courtesy : csmonitor.com

Read more at csmonitor.com

Let us hear from You

We would like to know you views on 3 things –

  1. Did you like this weekly roundup and would you like to see more of this?
  2. Do you really think that Fashion is something that should indulge in politics?
  3. What’s your thought on fashion as a form of protesting?

Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.

↑ Back To Top ↑